Press Kit

Official Bio

Arizona-native Rachel Robins spent the first few decades of her life baking in the desert. When 120ºF weather began to wear a little thin, she vacated the Valley of the Sun for the cooler, greener climes of Seattle, Washington. Rachel’s writing fuel is drawn from the pool of her experience gained from various backgrounds such as food service to sales, nonprofit work with children to academia--the latter of which has been her focus for the last 10 years. She holds a Bachelor in Arts in Christian Studies and an MFA for Writing Popular Fiction. While she’s dabbled in a variety of genres like fantasy, steampunk, dieselpunk, noir, and scifi, she tends to favor contemporary fantasy, comedy, and horror.

In her few moments of leisure, she divides her time by writing, crocheting, exploring the beautiful Pacific Northwest, and attempting to costume her two cats in between daily writing sessions. Her first novel features monsters and mindreading.

80-Word Byline

Rachel Robins is an American writer hailing from the Pacific Northwest by way of Arizona. A self-identified Medical Mutant, she lives a rich inner life with a steady diet of fiction, obscure science articles, theology, cat videos, drag queens and gluten-free concoctions. An MFA grad in Writing Popular Fiction, she’s dabbled in a variety of genres like fantasy, steampunk, dieselpunk, noir, and scifi, but she tends to favor supernatural thrillers, comedy, and horror. And dear God, is she single.

50-Word Byline

Rachel Robins is an American writer hailing from the Pacific Northwest by way of Arizona. An MFA grad in Writing Popular Fiction, she’s dabbled in a variety of genres like fantasy, steampunk, dieselpunk, noir, and scifi, but she tends to favor supernatural thrillers, comedy, and horror.

In All But Name

cover art in progress
Genre: Alt Universe / YA Supernatural Thriller
Status: complete
Length: 101,000 words

When 18-year-old Eva Raine, a handicapped human, is drafted to join DARPA's cryptid super-soldier program, she can’t handle it. But when her denial of her burgeoning abilities and her lack of control are responsible for nearly mind-flaying two people in the same manner her old boyfriend experienced two years earlier, she now must accept the idea that she might not be entirely human and train alongside the monsters around her. Between honing her newfound abilities and Eva’s loosening grip on reality as the result of them, not to mention the sudden appearance of an unintentional victim from her past who wants her dead, she may not make it out alive.

Novel Information

Urban fantasy saturates the market more and more with each passing day. So when I set down to write this story I wanted to focus the story around a character who was essentially the complete opposite of every urban fantasy or YA fantasy protagonist I’ve read. Eva isn’t beautiful, she’s not sexy or thin, and she’s not what is typically considered a sexual object. Heavily scarred from head to knee, Eva reflects a different demographic. A survivor of physical assault, Eva is physically handicapped and moves with a wide, hip-swinging walk due to a fused knee and badly healed double hip replacement. With her mobility limitations, she should literally be the last person drafted into DARPA. She's no soldier. But her physical and emotional scars from the past are the least of her problems in In All But Name. Eva was born human. She was raised human. She can’t recall ever doing anything that could be remotely misconstrued as otherwise. Unlike other supernatural thriller protagonists, Eva doesn’t want to be one of the monsters. For her, there’s nothing worse in this world than being one of them.

It’s a common trope for point of view characters to become more than human. To develop magic powers like super strength, shape shifting, or immortality. To a degree, being a vampire or werewolf or fairy or miscellaneous-whatever is somewhat elevated as the ideal and put upon a pedestal as a goal for the protagonist if they’re human. Or if they’re not, the goal is to develop further skill in these areas. I feel that Eva is easy for the teen reader to relate to since everyone questions in their youth, Who am I? And am I enough? At least once in their life, every teen faces a similar, though not quite exact, identity crisis. In All But Name sheds a different light on a common thread in fiction in the market, and as such, fills a gap that currently exists.

Back Copy

Everyone else is wrong. Despite what they say, 18-year-old Eva Raine is not one of the monsters. It's impossible. She was born human. She was raised human. Hell, she even looks human, plus or minus a few scars and some mobility issues. She can't flay minds. Eva’s just one of the few misclassified humans mislabeled in the system due to a freak accident from years ago. However, when she’s drafted to DARPA's cryptid super-soldier program, life goes topsy-turvy. Soon, her suppressed abilities bubble to the surface and people start screaming. Dying.

It’s hard to accept that you might be the very thing you fear the most. Eva’s a menace to anyone in her immediate proximity. Between the stresses of basic training exercises, the mysterious deaths cropping up on base, a reappearing ghost from her past, and her tenuous grip on reality, Eva must embrace who and what she really is if she’s going to survive.

And she might not like what that might be.